How to Check Canon Shutter Count (and Why it Matters)

canon camera

canon camera

Shutter count is to DSLRs what mileage is to cars. Circuit boards and other non-mechanical components have a virtually infinite lifespan, but shutters take quite a bit of wear and tear over its life. Canon DSLRs are generally rated to sustain anywhere from 50,000 to 300,000 shutter actuations before a shutter replacement is necessary (at a cost of several hundred dollars).

Photo: Pedro Pinheiro

Just as you always should know a car’s mileage before buying or selling, learning how to verify Canon shutter count is a no-brainer if you’re in the market for a used DSLR. The lower a camera’s shutter count, the more life it has remaining (barring unforeseen defects). Buy a camera with too high a shutter count and your investment might not last as long as you planned.

Determining Canon Shutter Count with EOSInfo

EOSInfo is a free utility for Windows that can determine the shutter count of any recent Canon DSLR. Mac users should download 40D Shutter Count. EOSInfo supports any Canon DIGIC III or DIGIC IV camera, including the 5D Mark II, Canon 50D, Canon 450D Canon 60D, Canon 7D and newer. It does not work with the Canon 5D. Canon 1D owners should click here.

Simply install the program, plug in your camera and go. When buying a Canon DSLR in person, always check the shutter count on your computer before taking it home. Walk or ask for a discount if the shutter count is exceeding high (see below for more info). When shopping online, ask the seller to verify the shutter count before buying.

canon camera

Photo: Jung-nam Nam

What if My Camera Isn’t Supported?

Older DSLRs such as the Canon 5D aren’t supported due to firmware limitations. Only Canon repair centers can provide accurate shutter readings for these models. This is a shame buyers of older models in particular have a need to verify shutter count– how do you know if a body has plenty of life left at 30,000 shutters or is creaking along at 198,000?
Just as you would check a car for wear and tear, check the body for signs of heavy use if you can’t verify the shutter count. Check the hand grips for fading or recent replacement. The hot shoe is another area of heavy use. Cameras with very worn hot shoes are very likely to have high shutter counts. The same is true for the tripod mount on the bottom. Check the serial number to determine the manufacturing date. And of course, ask the seller! Perhaps she already had the shutter replaced and has the paperwork to verify the repair.

What is the Maximum Shutter Count Rating for My Camera?

The Canon Shutter Life Expectancy Database is a handy source for real-life numbers. It contains hundreds of reports from users about how many shutter actuations their cameras have while still alive and how many shots they took if their shutter has already died. Compare the shutter count of a DSLR with this database as numbers vary widely by model. Here are some stats:

  • Canon 30D: 128,908 actuations on average before death.
  • Canon 5D: 48.1% survive 557,000- 876,000 actuations. The average camera died after 389,187 actuations.
  • Canon 450D (Rebel XSi): Only 38,995 actuations on average before shutter failure. Canon rates this model at 100,000, which clearly isn’t the case.
  • Canon 1Ds Mark III: 730,7645 actuations (note: only 42 data points)

As you’d expect, Canon’s professional lines last much longer than entry-level DSLRs.

Canon Shutter Count FAQ

Can’t I just look at the number (ie IMG-1029) on my memory card to determine shutter count?
If you’ve only ever used one memory card with the DSLR, yes. However, changing out memory cards or resetting the camera could change the numbering. You can’t stick a new card in a camera, shoot a picture and get an accurate shutter reading.

What affect does Live View have on the shutter count? Videos?
Turning on Live View increases the shutter count by one, as do videos of any length.

The camera I bought online has a high shutter count. Should I return it?
It’s not always possible to verify shutter count prior to purchase. In these situations, always purchase from a merchant with a no-hassle return policy and check pictures of the item for wear.

A high shutter count isn’t necessarily a deal breaker. If you’re keeping the body for a few vacations or as a backup, it’s unlikely to die. Shooting weddings every weekend for the next three years? That’s a different story. Always factor the cost of shutter replacement into a heavily used camera. This should also be reflected in the price to an extent. If peace of mind is you’re thing, consider a third-party warranty.